Steer Clear to Win

Excerpt from Five Percent Chance by Jerrod Sessler

Copyright © 2009 by Jerrod and Nikki Sessler

ISBN 978-0-615-33332-8 

LCCN 200994067

 

My hope is that this book is not characterized as a book with a bunch of “don’t do’s.” In fact, I nearly omitted this section altogether because I feel it is much more important that you focus on what you can do rather than what you cannot or should not do. In other words, you can be very successful in just doing the right things right, for the right reasons, rather than focusing on avoiding the wrong things and giving yourself a bad attitude and overall miserable disposition.

With that said, I am going to be very brief here and give you a list of the items you should avoid and the reasons why. I also want you to see how these apply to my recipes for disease, illness, and obesity. After this list, I have highlighted the two biggest concerns I have after having lived this diet for a number of years.

The foods listed below create most of the physical problems we experience. To have real health, eliminate them from your diet as quickly as possible. 

 

Foods to Be Avoided

Beverages. Alcohol, coffee, tea, cocoa, carbonated beverages and soft drinks, all artificial fruit drinks including sports drinks, and all commercial juices containing preservatives, salt, and sweeteners.

Dairy. All milk, cheese, eggs, ice cream, whipped toppings, and non-dairy creamers.

Fruit. Canned and sweetened fruits, along with non-organic dried fruits.

Grains. Refined, bleached flour products, cold breakfast cereals, and white rice.

Meats. Beef, pork fish, chicken, turkey, hamburgers, hot dogs, bacon, sausage, etc.

Nuts & Seeds. All roasted and/or salted seeds and nuts. Though peanuts are not a nut but a legume, they are very difficult to digest and should also be avoided. 

Oils. All lard, margarine, shortenings, and anything containing hydrogenated oils.

Seasonings. Table salt, black pepper, and any seasonings containing them. 

Soups. All canned, packaged, or creamed soups containing dairy products. 

Sweets. All refined white or brown sugars, sugar syrups, chocolate, candy, gum, cookies, donuts, cakes, pies, or other products containing refined sugars or artificial sweeteners. 

Vegetables. All canned vegetables containing added sodium or preservatives, or vegetables fried in oil. 

Once you have stopped eating the foods that will harm your health and started eating the foods that will enhance your health, you may experience some symptoms of detoxification. If you do, take heart! This means you are getting rid of toxins that have been stored in your body. 


If I was told I could only name two things to avoid consuming and I had to limit my list to just these, then this is what I would say. It is tough to categorize these appropriately because I have really strong feelings about both but I don’t think there is nearly as much science or personal experience around the second one as compared to the first so I will go in this order:

 

Animal products of any kind would be one that I would simply avoid all together. Dr. T. Colin Campbell explains, in detail, why animal products are so bad for the human body in his book, The China Study. It has to do with the protein and how it is processed in our bodies. It is really bad for our bodies as it leads to many of the western diseases we commonly experience as a culture. Dr. Joel Fuhrman in Eat to Live confirms this, and many life stories along with hundreds of scientific studies also corroborate this fact. This includes dairy, quite significantly because dairy includes the animal protein which is the chief contributor to the physical ailments. The story around fish and seafood is rather vague, however. It seems the protein in these swimmers is not as big of a problem as is the toxic load from the heavy metals often found in them. I ate some fish during the first couple of years of the lifestyle change but it was infrequent and in small portions. Eat to Live has a chart showing which fish are more likely to contain more heavy metals.

 

Excitotoxins of all kinds would be next on my list. I learned everything I know about excitotoxins from Dr. Russell Blaylock in his book by the same name, that is, other than what I learned by experiencing the chemical poisoning from excitotoxins first hand on several occasions. Because I know you want to know what an excitotoxin is, I will provide a brief overview here but if you want to know details, then check out Dr. Blaylock’s book.

What is an excitotoxin? An excitotoxin is an amino acid. Our bodies use a lot of amino acids regularly. The problem is that there are ways of creating amino acids in such a manner that they zoom past the protective blood-brain barrier and wreak havoc on our brain neurons (receptors). These “bad” amino acids are dubbed excitotoxins for reasons you are about to learn. The excitotoxin amino acid makes its way to the receptors in the brain that control the “feel good” signals. Interestingly enough, it is sort of like a gate. The excitotoxin holds open the gate to the receptor while calcium rushes in to cause the receptor to fire in rapid succession, sending a “feel good” signal elsewhere in the brain. Zinc and magnesium are designed to hold the gate closed in certain circumstances, but a deficiency in these minerals is common and thus leaves the receptors even more vulnerable. In other words, we are duped into thinking whatever we just did (or ate) was good for us and pleasurable. Soon after, the receptors (neurons) effected by the excitotoxin die. Here is what Dr. Blaylock says about the effects of the excitotoxins:

“When neurons are exposed to these substances, they become very excited and fire their impulses very rapidly until they reach a state of extreme exhaustion. Several hours later these neurons suddenly die, as if the cells were excited to death. As a result, neuroscientists have dubbed this class of chemicals ‘excitotoxins.’”

Clearly excitotoxins are something we should avoid, but where are they found? Some of the common names would be MSG, which is an acronym for monosodium glutamate or hydrolyzed protein. The problem is that many people know about the negative effects of MSG, so food manufacturers have resorted to creating new, similar substances and conveniently renaming them something else.  We have created another blog post with a fairly detailed list of excitotoxins that you may use for reference.

It is also important to remember my encouragement to think about what you can do rather than going too far down this path of all that you are bound from. There are more options than any of us combined will ever be able to explore and experience. Find the freedom in your lifestyle instead of focusing on the “don’t do’s.”


Jerrod Sessler
Founder of Hot Feet Fitness

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